November 19, 2012 - The George Economou Collection - CHANCE
November 19, 2012

CHANCE

Marina Abramović/Ulay, Rest Energy, 1980. Performance for video; Dublin, 1980. Color video with sound, 4 minutes, 4 seconds. © Marina Abramović.

CHANCE
1 November 2012–26 February 2013

The George Economou Collection
80, Kifissias Ave. and 77, Grammou Str.
15125 Marousi, Athens, Greece

Open Monday to Friday 10 to 6pm, Thursday 10 to 8pm

T +30 2108090 595/519

www.thegeorgeeconomoucollection.com

The George Economou Collection is pleased to announce CHANCE, an exhibition exploring the perception of chance in private and public life through a selection of provocative performances by Marina Abramović, David Hammons and Robin Rhode.

An ephemeral happening in life, chance is similar to performance, yet here it is staged and revealed through monochromatic photography, video and variegated installation. Each performance challenges the mystical nature of chance having used the body and a tool with no absolute ruling. The action sways in either direction beyond one’s control and within this limbo, the viewer is invited to decide for themselves.

Often describing herself as the “grandmother of performance art,” Marina Abramović plays between the breaking points of the body and the mind. In her collaboration withlongtime partner Ulay, she surrenders full control and enters a life-threatening, vulnerableposition in their performance, Rest Energy (1980). Applying the weight of their bodies,Abramović leans backward grasping a bow, while Ulay opposite her also leans backward,clinging onto the taut arrow directed at her heart. As the timed four minutes pass, theyremain steadfast countering their fatigue and rapidly increasing heart beat. Abramovićadmits the performance explored love and “complete and total trust.”

Countering this private world, David Hammons in the 1970s became preoccupied with the breakdown of cultural classifications placed in the “high” or the “low” and set the judgment of the art historical canon into question. His installation Untitled from 2008 launches this conceptual ideology by confronting the elitist identity of painting, notably abstract expressionism. Hammons imprints his physicality by actively thrusting a wooden armoire with its mirrored front against the colorful, gestural surface of the canvas. Here, the artist summons the viewer to imagine and reinterpret distinguished forms of twentieth century art, with no control in the final resolve.

Drawing from South African post-apartheid experiences and the memories of those generations before him, Robin Rhode’s subject matter varies from poverty, politics, petty crime, gambling and racial stereotypes. In the photographic installation, 36 Ways a Dice can Roll/ Dice (2011), he captures the fundamental human will to succeed, often with great risk to achieve a certain desired reward. The thirty-six storyboard inspired panels depict Rhode as protagonist, disguised as a common “suit,” tossing an imaginary, colossal pair of dice drawn on an industrial urban wall. Through a sequence of staged sweeping actions, the viewer reflects on the tension between desire, gain and loss in the ever unpredictable game of life.


Media contact
Annie-Claire Geisinger, T +30 2108090595 / M +30 6947404053 / acgeisinger [​at​] economoucollection.com.

 

 


 

The George Economou Collection presents CHANCE
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