January 18, 2011 - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum - Course and Film Screenings
January 18, 2011

Course and Film Screenings

Public and Artist Interaction: The Conceptual Studio, taught by Karen Finley.
Photo by Tanya Ahmed, July 2010.

Course and Film Screenings

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue (at 89th Street)
New York City
Guggenheim.org/education

Please join us in the Sackler Center for Arts Education for the following programs related to The Great Upheaval: Modern Art from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910–1918.

Course
Public & Artist Interactions

The Artist’s Voice with Karen Finley
Mondays, February 28, 5:30–8:30 pm; March 7, 14, 21, 6–8:30 pm; March 28, 5:30–8:30 pm

Taught by artist Karen Finley and drawing from works on view in The Great Upheaval: Modern Art from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910–1918 and Found in Translation, part of the Deutsche Bank Series at the Guggenheim, this five-session workshop engages adults in writing exercises, studio work, museum visits, and collaborative discussion to explore language as metaphor, text as visual media, and their own inner voice. A final reflection concludes the process. No art-making experience is required.

Best known for her politically engaged and character-driven performance art, Finley (b. 1958, Chicago) engages audiences by addressing social issues such as violence against women, the AIDS crisis, and censorship. Some of her latest work includes The Impulse to Suck (2008), The Jackie Look (2010), and Open Hearts (2010), a Holocaust memorial in Prenning, Austria. Finley teaches at the Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. She performs, exhibits, lectures, and conducts workshops internationally.

Public & Artist Interactions invites contemporary artists to be collaborative partners in the creation of unique learning experiences.

For more information and to register, call 212 423 3781 or visit guggenheim.org/courses.

Film Program
This program of international films from the early 20th century spans the period of The Great Upheaval: Modern Art from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910–1918. During these years, the burgeoning film industry quickly became a quintessential facet of modern life, offering escapism, decadence, and a sense of community through shared media. Visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings for the complete schedule.

Fridays, February 11, 18, 25, 1 pm
Les amours de la reine Élizabeth (The Loves of Queen Elizabeth), 1912
Directed by Louis Mercanton
16 mm, silent with musical score, 35 min.
Courtesy Museum of Modern Art, New York, Circulating Film & Video Library
Condensed from a play of the same name, Louis Mercanton’s 1914 French silent film chronicles the love affair between Queen Elizabeth I of England and the Earl of Essex. Starring Sarah Bernhardt as the titular monarch, it also features one of Joseph Carl Breil’s earliest feature-film scores. The movie was released in New York by the studio known today as Paramount Pictures, and its box-office success convinced American producers of the feature-length film’s commercial viability.

Free with museum admission.

On View in the Sackler Center
A Chronology: The Guggenheim Collection, 1909–1979
February 18–September 11

In 1937, Solomon R. Guggenheim established a foundation with the goal of opening a museum to publicly exhibit and preserve his holding of modern art. Since then, the museum’s founding collection has been enhanced through major gifts and purchases from pioneering individuals who share Guggenheim’s spirit. This exhibition presents a visually dynamic timeline of this extraordinary metamorphosis from private collection to public museum.

Course and Film Screenings
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