February 16, 2010 - Afterall - Issue 23 out now
February 16, 2010

Issue 23 out now

Issue 23

Spring 2010

Babette Mangolte, Lidwien van de Ven,
Thea Djordjadze, Trinh T. Minh-ha

www.afterall.org

Afterall announces the publication of the issue 23 (Spring 2010), which looks at issues of representation and the construction of visibility.

Miguel A. López discusses the processes of historicising Latin American art of the 1960s and 70s, and how current readings of key political events, such as the ‘Tucumán Arde’ episode in 1968, are questioning what has been placed under the geographical and art-historical rubric ‘Latin American Conceptualism‘.

In an analysis of the use of shadow in the film performances of British film-makers Malcolm Le Grice and Gill Eatherley, Lucy Reynolds relates British Expanded Cinema‘s attempt for a ‘cinema without illusion’ to the experiences of the uncanny and outmoded raised by pre-cinematic spectacles.

Looking at Babette Mangolte‘s filming of key performance pieces of the 1970s, and at Mangolte’s own films and installation work, Barbara Clausen explores the relationship between performance and documentation forty years on. Mangolte and Elena Filipovic speak about Mangolte’s involvement in the experimental theatre, film and dance scenes of 1970s New York, and her own films of that period, discussing what it means to represent the work of others.

Roger M. Buergel looks back at Lidwien van de Ven‘s document, her installation of photographs at documenta 12, in terms of their investment in both memory and perception. Annie Fletcher speaks to Lidwien van de Ven about her working method, her relation to media images of conflicts and politics, and her mapping of the field of the visible.

Sarah Lowndes looks at the processes of creation, ritual and translation in Thea Djordjadze‘s obliquely referential sculptures and installations, and Vanessa Joan Müller examines Djordjadze’s questioning of categories and fixed temporal structures as means of understanding or ‘reading’ objects.

An van. Dienderen uses the ideas of the ‘interval’ and plural authorship to situate Trinh T. Minh-ha‘s films and books within the many worlds — post-colonial, feminist, independent film, artistic — into which her works cross over. Joshua Fausty asks, in a study of Trinh’s critical writing, whether the essay form can offer new ways of describing the world.

In the back section, Claire Barliant surveys new strategies in art-making in the US in response to the housing crisis, while David Quigley looks at the early twentieth-century figure Carl Einstein to analyse how we write art history. Finally, Pieter Van Bogaert sets into contrast Georges Didi-Huberman’s reading of images of the Holocaust with Renzo Martens‘s video Episode 3: Enjoy Poverty.

Issue 23 can be purchased in bookshops across the UK, Europe and America.
 For more information on Afterall or to subscribe, visit our website: www.afterall.org.

Exclusive to our website, Afterall Online publishes new content twice a month. Recent posts include a discussion between the film-maker Duncan Campbell and Stuart Comer, a photo-essay on British radical printshops, and an essay by Nav Haq on the valuation of art.

Afterall Books‘ latest titles are Richard Long: A Line Made by Walking by Dieter Roelstraete and Marcel Duchamp: Étant donnés by Julian Jason Haladyn. For more information on the One Work series please visit www.afterall.org/books/one.work/

Afterall journal is published by Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design, London, in association with MuHKA, Antwerp and UNIA arteypensamiento, Seville.

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