October 28, 2006 - Tate Modern - Tate Modern’s L2 Gallery presents a new series of contemporary displays
October 28, 2006

Tate Modern’s L2 Gallery presents a new series of contemporary displays

Tate Modern’s L2 Gallery presents a new series of contemporary displays

Tate Modern presents a new series of displays dedicated to showcasing the latest trends in contemporary art. The displays will be held in Level 2 Gallery which is located close to the gallerys North Entrance facing the river.

Tate Moderns L2 Gallery presents a new series of contemporary displays

Tate Modern presents a new series of displays dedicated to showcasing the latest trends in contemporary art. The displays will be held in Level 2 Gallery which is located close to the gallerys North Entrance facing the river.
Rings of Saturn, which runs until 3 December, is the first in this new series of displays. The title is inspired by W.G. Sebalds voyages of cultural discovery and the exhibiting artists share a fascination with bohemianism, indigenous arts and crafts, folk culture, fairytales, paganism and heroes. Artist whose work is presented include Steve Claydon, Natalie Djrberg, Saul Fletcher, Thomas Helbig, Dorota Jurczak, David Noonan, David Wojnarowicz and Thomas Zipp. A myriad of subjects are explored, including overlooked historical figures and alternative lifestyle models, as well as forgotten political and utopian movements. Other works reinvigorate the legacies of Expressionism and Surrealism through the use of psychic energy.
Media Burn is the second in this new series and runs from 15 December until 11 February. Taking its title from a 1975 Ant Farm work in which a Cadillac drives through a wall of blazing TV screens, this provocative display mixes works from the 1970s and 80s with contemporary pieces to examine the blurred boundaries between art, politics, protest and the media. The featured artists are Ant Farm, Wynne Greenwood, K8 Hardy, Sharon Hayes, Peter Kennard, Josephine Meckseper, Valérie Mréjen, Martha Rosler and Jens Ullrich. Martha Roslers incisive collages offer a commentary on the Iraq war, whilst Valérie Mréjens hypnotic essay explores the limited horizons of a 1970s French housewife. Jens Ullrich presents documentary photographs of demonstrations in which the placards have being doctored to become meaningless and Josephine Mecksepers specially commissioned shop window display seemingly tempts viewers with a glistening array of consumer goods but, on closer inspection, offers a serious message about todays consumerist culture.

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