The New York Public Library


Ed Ruscha and Paul Holdengräber: LIVE from the NYPL

Jerry McMillan, Ed covered with twelve of his books, 1970. Gelatin silver print, 13 1/2 x 9 inches (34.3 x 22.9 cm), Edition of 20. Courtesy of Craig Krull Gallery, Santa Monica, California.

Ed Ruscha and Paul Holdengräber: A Conversation.
LIVE from the NYPL

Wednesday, March 6, 2013; 7pm

The New York Public Library
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
5th Avenue at 42nd Street

Tickets 

On March 6, Ed Ruscha takes the stage at The New York Public Library to reflect on his career and enduring influence in conversation with Paul Holdengräber, Director of LIVE from the NYPL.

Ruscha’s work has profoundly influenced countless modern artists, but his artist books—such as Twentysix Gasoline Stations, Every Building on the Sunset Strip, Thirtyfour Parking Lots in Los Angeles, and A Few Palm Trees—offer a unique opportunity to trace that influence directly to the near and far corners of the modern art world. For decades, a broad spectrum of artists have produced their own small books, revisiting, rebelling against, and responding to the American painter and photographer’s idiosyncratic collections. 

Now, Ruscha’s artist books and the fascinatingly kindred works they inspired are the focus of a new exhibition at Gagosian Gallery (March 5–April 27, 2013, at 980 Madison Avenue, New York) and book—Various Small Books: Referencing Various Small Books by Ed Ruscha from MIT Press—both of which showcase Ruscha’s materials alongside the numerous books they influenced.

For more information and to purchase tickets to this event, click here. For additional information about LIVE from the NYPL and to see a full schedule of upcoming events in the series, please visit NYPL.org/LIVE.

LIVE from the NYPL is made possible with generous support from Celeste Bartos, Mahnaz Ispahani Bartos and Adam Bartos, and the Margaret and Herman Sokol Public Education Endowment Fund.


Ed Ruscha and Paul Holdengräber: LIVE from the NYPL

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