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a hook but no fish 

Sriwhana Spong

This video is no longer available

Takeover: III. Mind Takeover a hook but no fish 
Sriwhana Spong
2017

25 Minutes

Date
Repeat: Dec 15-16 ET

a hook but no fish explores the lingua ignota (unknown language) received by the twelfth-century German mystic Hildegard von Bingen. The film begins at Disibodenberg in Germany, the site of the monastery where the child Von Bingen was given as a tithe and interned with two other women. The film moves from Hildegard’s place of internment, where she first began to write, to the desktop of an unknown narrator, to the living room of a flat, to a farmhouse, to scenes of birds swarming and roaming through streets in London and Rotterdam. This vertiginous time-travel is accompanied by a score composed by Aotearoa musician Frances Duncan. a hook but no fish speculates whether the lingua ignota is a prophetic language for an arid time such as our own, where rivers run dry, mammals no longer exist, and only technology and tools survive, and asks what Von Bingen’s act of renaming things with a green-sampling word might bring about.

This screening is part of Mind Takeover, the third chapter of the online program Takeover curated by Julian Ross for e-flux Video & Film, and unfolding in six chapters between September 22 and December 15, 2022, with the films and videos of each chapter streaming for two weeks.

For more information, contact program@e-flux.com.

Category
Film, Language & Linguistics, Religion & Spirituality
Subject
Video Art, Futures
Return to III. Mind Takeover

Sriwhana Spong is an artist from Aotearoa New Zealand based in London. Drawing on the particular and ecstatic practices of women mystics, Spong produces scripts of her body that document in various mediums the oscillations of distance and intimacy produced by her approach toward another—most recently, a rat nesting outside her window; a newly discovered species of snake; a painting by her grandfather, the Balinese painter, I Gusti Made Rundu; and a twelfth-century Javanese poem. These encounters spark journeys, where experiential knowledge, autobiography, fiction, and systematic research produce films, sculptures, performances, and reorientations.

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