Lois Weinberger: Debris Field

Lois Weinberger: Debris Field

Museum Tinguely

Images from Lois Weinberger, "Debris Field," 2010–2016. [1] Untitled, 2014. Mummified Cat, 18th century, photographic work, 60 x 90 cm. Photo: Paris Tsitsos. © Studio Weinberger. [2 & 5] Finds from the attic, parent’s house, Stams in Tyrol, 14th to 20th century. Photo: Paris Tsitsos. © Studio Weinberger. [3] Four Figures, 2018. Topsoil, wood, each sculpture c. 43 x 18 x 12 cm. © Studio Weinberger. [4] Silverfish Initials, 18th century, printed paper. © Studio Weinberger.

April 15, 2019
Lois Weinberger
Debris Field
April 17–September 1, 2019
Opening: April 16, 6:30pm
Museum Tinguely
Paul Sacher-Anlage 1
CH-4002 Basel
Switzerland
Hours: Tuesday–Sunday 11am–6pm,
Thursday 11am–9pm

tinguelybasel.infos@roche.com
www.tinguely.ch
Facebook / Instagram

Museum Tinguely invites you cordially to the opening of the new exhibition on Tuesday, April 16, 2019 in Basel. With Lois Weinberger – Debris Field we will present a poetic-archaeological research project from April 17 to September 1, 2019. The Austrian artist explores and stages relics from several centuries of history found at Weinberger’s parents’ farm. Debris Field (2010–2016) is an inventory, an excavation that takes place in the sedimentary layers of time in the attic and gaps between the floors of the building. Weinberger sees the house as an archive of life and the relics as marginalia that define the true focus of the archive, its gaps. He lends expression to these essential gaps and their spaces of memory with poetic works and thus illustrates an everyday surrealism with objects, drawings, texts and photographic works. It is the third exhibition in a series that seeks to engage in a dialogue with Jean Tinguely’s late masterpiece Mengele-Dance of Death (1986) and to show its multi-layered nature. This year’s presentation opens a dialogue around the various farm biographies that served as material sources of inspiration for the two works.

Pioneer of artistic field research
Lois Weinberger (1947* Stams, Tyrol) first came to international attention with a work for documenta X in 1997, for which he sowed the seeds of invasive plants onto abandoned railway tracks creating a metaphor for the processes of migration in our time. He focuses on the beauty of the unnoticed, the spurned, the hidden of the back sides and brownfields. With a variety of modes of expression and a penchant for the experimental, Weinberger presents his research as multi-layered processes that reveal constant change, becoming and passing. In their openness and indefiniteness, they invite the beholder as an accomplice to set out on a journey and to make own discoveries.

The work Debris Field (2010–2016) explores and stages relics from several centuries of history found at Weinberger’s parents’ farm. The farm managed by his family until today is linked to Stams Abbey and reflects a history of mutual influence. It preserves and tells stories of piety, superstition and the sparse life full of privation between the high culture of the abbey and forms of behaviour linked to the late medieval period. Debris Field has the form of an excavation that takes place in the sedimentary layers of time in the attic and gaps between the floors of the building. Due to the lack of contact with the ground and dampness, this ‘archaeology of the housed’ reveals a wealth of objects much like a chamber of curiosities, an amazing universe of peasant life that enables a more profound take on everyday life. Weinberger sees the house as an archive of life and the relics as marginalia that define the true focus of the archive, its gaps. He lends expression to these essential gaps and their spaces of memory with poetic works and thus illustrates an everyday surrealism with objects, drawings, texts and photographic works. Associative, playful-animistic stagings arise revaluations, including things that are not considered of import for classical archaeology.

In dialogue with Jean Tinguelys Mengele-Dance of Death (1986)
Lois Weinberger – Debris Field is the third exhibition in a series that seeks to engage in a dialogue with Jean Tinguely’s Mengele-Dance of Death (1986) and strives to emphasise the multi-layered aspects of this late key work. For the opening of the new exhibition space, the first presentation in 2017 with Jérôme Zonder directed attention at the aspect of the critique of totalitarianism; the second with Gauri Gill focused on the subjects of memento mori and the Danse Macabre. The third show with Weinberger opens a dialogue around the various farm biographies that served as material sources of inspiration for the two works.

The exhibition is being set up by Roland Wetzel, director of Museum Tinguely, in close collaboration with the artist.

Advertisement
Map
RSVP
RSVP for Lois Weinberger: Debris Field
Museum Tinguely
April 15, 2019

Thank you for your RSVP.

Museum Tinguely will be in touch.

Subscribe
I have read e-flux’s privacy policy and agree that e-flux may send me announcements to the email address entered above and that my data will be processed for this purpose in accordance with e-flux’s privacy policy*

Thank you for your interest in e-flux. Check your inbox to confirm your subscription.