Myths are relatively simple stories that, through the use of metaphor and other narrative devices, cut to the core of what it means to be human. By providing wider narratives that everyone can relate to, myths teach us about ourselves, about each other. Myths allow us to imagine another time, another way of being and living, and create bridges from the here and now to the there and then.

Tomorrow’s Myths is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture and "2086: Together How?,” the Korean Pavilion at the 18th International Architecture Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia curated by Soik Jung and Kyong Park.

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7 essays
Federico Campagna
Thus, Ibn Tufail claimed, all true philosophers are born: by looking around and inside themselves, and then translating their observations into practical abstractions that can guide their lives.
In 2086, without precedent, a great, discretionary power was granted to the organization for the Decarbonization Initiative. People from all walks of life united by a shared vision temporarily put aside their main professions and sat down at the roundtable.
Eman Abdelhadi and M. E. O'Brien
I’m on Fire Island, and I met a ghost. I had to tell you, and apparently the only way to do so is a handwritten letter! They cut off our phones and augs. This is such a bizarre format, but here we are.
Yunjeong Han
If there is any civilization remaining on earth in the year 2086, it will be an ecological civilization. An anti-ecological industrial civilization that exceeds the earth’s capacity will likely still exist on a much smaller scale than today, but we will no longer call it “civilization.” People in regions that fail to adapt to the rapidly changing conditions on earth or fail to build an ecological civilization will live lives like scenes from disaster movies, constantly pressed for survival.
Alice Bucknell
The body sought out what it could no longer sense, but the brain couldn’t stomach that absence. It was as if the reduction of the senses also shut down the sense of self, negating one’s existence in the world.
There is an abundance of data, predictions, and signs that the climate crisis is on the verge of catastrophe. However, I do not want to imagine a future without humans. Even in the very worst case, I don’t want to give up hope that a small number of people, living close to the land in a small corner of the earth, will survive.
Soik Jung, Kyong Park, and e-flux Architecture
Tomorrow’s Myths is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture and “2086: Together How?,” the Korean Pavilion at the 18th International Architecture Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia curated by Soik Jung and Kyong Park.
Category
Architecture, Urbanism, Nature & Ecology, Utopia
Subject
Futures, Futurism, Fiction, Science Fiction, Mythology

Tomorrow’s Myths is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture and "2086: Together How?,” the Korean Pavilion at the 18th International Architecture Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia curated by Soik Jung and Kyong Park.

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