Podcasts

Conversations with some of the most engaged artists and thinkers working today. Available for subscription on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, and Soundcloud.

Transcripts are available for our hearing-impaired listeners on request, please email contact [​at​] e-flux.com.

e-flux podcast
3 weeks ago
42:58
Franco “Bifo” Berardi on the future possibility of living well

e-flux journal editorial assistant Andreas Petrossiants speaks to Franco “Bifo” Berardi following his recent texts “(Sensitive) Consciousness and Time: Against the Transhumanist Utopia” in issue 98, and “Game Over in issue 100.

Franco Berardi, aka “Bifo,” founder of the famous Radio Alice in Bologna and an important figure in the Italian Autonomia movement, is a writer, media theorist, and social activist. His most recent books are Breathing: Chaos and Poetry (Semiotexte, 2018) and The Second Coming (Polity, 2019).

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1 month ago
35:41
Satellite music series: Peter Zummo and Eve Essex

Sanna Almajedi talks to composer and trombonist Peter Zummo, and Eve Essex, a musician who performs with alto saxophone, piccolo, voice and electronics.

The music heard in this episode was recorded live during the fifth edition of Satellite at Bar Laika on March 12, 2019, featuring Zummo and Essex. 

Peter Zummo is a composer and trombonist whose music encompasses both the contemporary-classical and vernacular genres. His work is informed by five decades of realizing the work of other composers, poets, bandleaders, choreographers, directors, and filmmakers. The way in which he maneuvers the contemporary trombone is genre non-conforming, and still finds a place in any genre. 

Zummo worked closely with Arthur Russell, appearing on many of his recordings. He has also collaborated with Pauline Oliveros, Phil Niblock, and Yasunao Tone. His music has been released by Foom, Optimo Music, and Experimental Intermedia Foundation.

Eve Essex is a Brooklyn-based musician who performs with alto saxophone, piccolo, voice and electronics, harnessing elements of classical, drone, free jazz, and distorted pop. She has performed as Das Audit (with guitarist Craig Kalpakjian), as well as in trios Hesper (with James K and Via App), and HEVM (with MV Carbon and Hunter Hunt-Hendrix). She has also collaborated extensively with Juan Antonio Olivares as installation/performance-art duo Essex Olivares.

Her first solo album, Here Appear, was released by Soap Library (cassette) and Sky Walking (LP) in 2018. She also appears on Pan’s compilation Mono No Aware. Select solo performances include Artists Space, Outpost Artists Resources, Safe Gallery, and Meakusma Festival.

Satellite is a monthly experimental music series curated by Sanna Almajedi.

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1 month ago
27:48
Closed for installation: Fiona Connor

Andreas Petrossiants, Editorial Assistant for e-flux journal, speaks to artist Fiona Connor starting from her exhibition at SculptureCenter, Closed for installation, Fiona Connor, SculptureCenter, #4

As the show's press release describes:

"Los Angeles-based artist Fiona Connor remakes overlooked everyday objects, including bulletin boards, park benches, community noticeboards, doors of closed down clubs, real estate signs, municipal water fountains, and so on. She is interested in where these objects come from, what they are made out of, who makes them and for whom, as well as the relationships that the artist initiates and maintains in order to reproduce and re-present the objects as works of art.

For her new commission at SculptureCenter, Connor is producing a set of intersecting works that bring together the artist’s investment in the various operations of sculpture in an expansive field of production, maintenance, and display. In the gallery, she shows a number of bronze pieces that replicate tools required to install an exhibition, such as a measuring tape, a paint tray, a dolly, and scraps of cardboard. Nearby in an apartment in Long Island City, the artist arranges for an annual window cleaning, in perpetuity.

Later in the course of the exhibition, Connor convenes a series of workshops, using pulped institutional printed material to make a set of catalog-sized blocks that will function as the exhibition’s publication."

Read the full text here

Closed for installation, Fiona Connor, SculptureCenter, #4 is on view through July 29, 2019.

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2 months ago
47:52
ANOTHER WAR IS POSSIBLE: Karl Holmqvist

Artist Karl Holmqvist reads “ANOTHER WAR IS POSSIBLE” and “NUMBERS,” and speaks with artist and e-flux founder Anton Vidokle.

Karl Holmqvist is known for using a wide range of formats—poetry readings, installation, and sculpture–to bring out the primal qualities of language. He is one of a current generation of artists working with language and text as sculptural or performative material. Holmqvist says his work is meant to spark the creative process in the viewer, seeing his art and poetry as a translation of the complexities of contemporary life. He blends poetry with pop music and his texts, composed of anecdotes as famous as they are diverse, explore the themes of communication and language. Together, the works unpack the many operations of language, how it can occupy space and provoke “invisible images” within memory and imagination.

In February 2019, e-flux’s Bar Laika presented a new work by Karl Holmqvist: #FLU$$CH (29 minutes, 2017), with an introduction by and Q&A with Pati Hertling.

You can read “GORILLAZ GRRLZ,” Holmqvist’s contribution to e-flux journal’s SUPERCOMMUNITY project at the 56th Venice Biennale, here.

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3 months ago
39:53
Kader Attia on La Colonie and Algeria

e-flux journal editor Brian Kuan Wood speaks to Kader Attia, artist and founder of La Colonie, a space in Paris for sharing ideas and discussion. Focussing on decolonialisation not only of people but also of knowledge, attitudes and practices, it aspires to de-compartmentalise knowledge by a trans-cultural, trans-disciplinary and trans-generational approach. Driven by the urgency of social and cultural reparations, it aims to reunite which has been shattered, or drift apart.

Kader Attia (b. 1970, France), grew up in Paris and in Algeria. Preceding his studies at the École Supérieure des Arts Appliqués Duperré and the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, and at Escola Massana, Centre d’Art i Disseny in Barcelona, he spent several years in Congo and in South America.

The experience with these different cultures, the histories of which over centuries have been characterised by rich trading traditions, colonialism and multi-ethnic societies, has fostered Kader Attia’s intercultural and interdisciplinary approach of research. For many years, he has been exploring the perspective that societies have on their history, especially as regards experiences of deprivation and suppression, violence and loss, and how this affects the evolving of nations and individuals—each of them being connected to collective memory.

His socio-cultural research has led Kader Attia to the notion of Repair, a concept he has been developing philosophically in his writings and symbolically in his oeuvre as a visual artist. With the principle of Repair being a constant in nature—thus also in humanity—, any system, social institution or cultural tradition can be considered as an infinite process of Repair, which is closely linked to loss and wounds, to recuperation and re-appropriation. Repair reaches far beyond the subject and connects the individual to gender, philosophy, science, and architecture, and also involves it in evolutionary processes in nature, culture, myth and history.

Attia's solo exhibition The Museum of Emotion at The Hayward Gallery, London recently closed. Upcoming 2019 exhibitions include a solo show opening in September at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, and group shows at Rubin Museum of Art, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, and The Phillips Collection.

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3 months ago
32:38
Ergonomic Futures: Tyler Coburn and Elvia Wilk

Following a recently published text in e-flux journal issue 98 (March 2019), Tyler Coburn joins Contributing Editor Elvia Wilk to discuss the project Ergonomic Futures.

Coburn's Ergonomic Futures asks questions about contemporary “fitness” through the lens of speculative evolution. The multi-part project includes furniture designed with Bureau V and a website of stories designed with Luke Gould and Afonso Martins.

Tyler Coburn is an artist and writer based in New York. His most recent book, Richard Roe, was published by Sternberg Press in March 2019.

–Watch a performance delivered at e-flux in 2016 as part of Ergonomic Futures on e-flux Video & Film

–Read "Ergonomic Futures," published in e-flux journal issue 98 (March 2019).

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4 months ago
36:33
Satellite music series: Lucie Vítková

Sanna Almajedi and Andreas Petrossiants speak with Lucie Vítková following her Satellite music series performance at Bar Laika.

Lucie Vítková is a composer, improviser, and performer (accordion, hichiriki, synthesizer, voice, and tap dance) from the Czech Republic. She recently organized a performance with OPERA Ensemble on climate change. For Satellite, Vítková performed two pieces, one from “Music Domestic,” and another from her “Post-Apocalyptic” series.

In 2017 Vítková was nominated to the Herb Alpert Awards in Arts in the category of Music, and was a resident artist at Roulette in 2018. She has put together two ensembles—the NYC Constellation Ensemble (focused on music behavior) and the OPERA Ensemble (for singing instrumentalists). During her 2017 Mentor/Protégé Residency in Tokyo, she studied hichiriki with Hitomi Nakamura and has been a member of the Columbia University Gagaku Ensemble. As an accordion player, she collaborated with the New York-based TAK Ensemble, S.E.M. ensemble, String Noise, Du.0, Argento Ensemble, CU Raaga, Ghost Ensemble, and Wet.

Satellite is a monthly experimental music series organized by Sanna Almajedi at Bar Laika by e-flux.

 

Music clips in order heard:

(1) Lucie Vítková, Music Domestic” (excerpt). Released by Bánh Mì Verlag, 2017.

(2) Lucie Vítková, “Post-Apocalyptic Piece” with water, live performance (excerpt).

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4 months ago
33:20
Three science-fiction scenarios: Tony Wood and Brian Kuan Wood

Tony Wood and Brian Kuan Wood discuss Intrusions: Or, The Golden Age Is Not in Us” published in e-flux journal #98, March 2019. The text examines three science-fiction scenarios that for Tony illustrate three collapses of orders of magnitude or scale—Samuel R. Delany’s Dhalgren, written in the US in the 1970s; Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker, filmed in the USSR in the same decade; and Jeff VanderMeer’s Southern Reach trilogy, published in the US in the 2010s.

Tony Wood lives in New York and writes about Latin America and Russia. He is the author of Russia without Putin: Money, Power and the Myths of the New Cold War (2018), and is currently working on a PhD about the Latin American radical left in the 1920s and 1930s.

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5 months ago
29:19
Satellite music series: C. Spencer Yeh

Sanna Almajedi speaks with C. Spencer Yeh following his Satellite music series performance at Bar Laika. 

C. Spencer Yeh is recognized for his interdisciplinary activities and collaborations as an artist, improviser, and composer, as well his music project Burning Star Core. Originally conceived in 1993 in Cincinnati, the project was known for its unique blend of musique concrète, ambient, drone, and psychedelic music. His recent solo albums Solo Voice I-X (2015) and The RCA Mark II (2018) were published by Primary Information. His video works are distributed by Electronic Arts Intermix. Recent exhibitions and presentations of his work include Shocking Asia at Empty Gallery, Hong Kong; Two Workaround Works Around Calder at the Whitney Museum, New York; Modern Mondays at MoMA, New York; and Tony Conrad Tribute at Atelier Nord/Ultima Festival, Oslo. 

 

Satellite is a monthly experimental music series organized by Sanna Almajedi at Bar Laika by e-flux.

Music clips in order heard:

(1) C. Spencer Yeh, "SOLO VOICE LIVE," from a performance of the album, December 2015 in Chicago at the Option series, Experimental Sound Studios.

(2) CS Yeh, "I Can Read Your Mind," from the album "Transitions" (on De Stijl label).

(3) Burning Star Core, "Benjamin," from the album "The Very Heart of the World."

Also mentioned: 

Spectacle Theatre, a collectively run screening space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA)'s exhibition, The Moon Represents My Heart: Music, Memory and Belonging, is on view May 2–September 15, 2019 in New York.

 

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6 months ago
26:44
Satellite music series: Keith Fullerton Whitman

Sanna Almajedi speaks with Keith Fullerton Whitman following his Satellite music series performance at Bar Laika. 

A composer and performer living in Brooklyn, Keith Fullerton Whitman is currently in the process of realizing geographically and thematically relevant live electronic music under the “Redactions” banner, as well as performing contemporary revisions of his classic “Generators” and “Playthroughs” frameworks. He recently performed at the GRM's Immersion festival in Paris, Documenta 14 in Athens, The Labyrinth in Niigata, MaerzMusik's The Long Now in Berlin, Semibreve in Braga, Send + Receive in Winnipeg, The Geometry of Now in Moscow, and the Don Buchla Memorial Concerts in San Francisco.

Satellite is a monthly experimental music series organized by Sanna Almajedi at Bar Laika by e-flux.

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6 months ago
25:54
Collective Intelligence: Agnieszka Kurant, Tobias Rees, and Elvia Wilk (part 2/2)

Artist Agnieszka Kurant and researcher Tobias Rees in conversation with e-flux journal Contributing Editor Elvia Wilk.

 

Agnieszka Kurant explores how complex social, economic and ecological systems can operate in ways that confuse distinctions between fiction and reality or nature and culture. Probing collective intelligence, surveillance capitalism, AI and the evolution of culture, labor and creativity, she investigates automation, crowdsourcing and data exploitation in the context of art production. Her works often behave like living organisms, self-organized complex systems or bachelor machines. Her past projects include a commission for the façade of the Guggenheim Museum (2015) and a solo exhibition at the Sculpture Center, New York (2013). In 2010 she co-represented Poland at the Venice Biennale of Architecture. Her work was featured in exhibitions at Palais de Tokyo, Guggenheim Bilbao, Tate Modern, Witte de With, Moderna Museet, MUMOK, Bonner Kunstverein, The Kitchen, Frieze Projects and Performa Biennial. She is an artist in residence at MIT CAST and a fellow of the Smithsonian Institute and the Berggruen Institute.

Tobias Rees is the Reid Hoffman Professor of Humanities at the New School for Social Research, Director at the Los Angeles-based Berggruen Institute, and a Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. 
 
Rees finds himself intrigued by situations that are not reducible to the already thought and known—by events, small ones or large ones, that set the taken for granted in motion and thereby provoke unanticipated openings for which no one has words yet. In his writings he seeks to capture something of the at times wild, at other times tender, almost fragile openness that rules as long as the new/different has not yet gained any stable contours—when it is pure movement.
 
Over the last decade his research has explored possibilities of practicing the human sciences after the figure of the human on which the human sciences (and art) has been contingent failed us: The human—the object of the human sciences is a figure not known before the late eighteenth century. 
 
He is the author of Designs for an Anthropology of the Contemporary (2008), Plastic Reason (2016), and most recently of After Ethnos (2018).
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6 months ago
33:17
Collective Intelligence: Agnieszka Kurant, Tobias Rees, and Elvia Wilk (part 1/2)

Artist Agnieszka Kurant and researcher Tobias Rees in conversation with e-flux journal Contributing Editor Elvia Wilk.

 

Agnieszka Kurant explores how complex social, economic and ecological systems can operate in ways that confuse distinctions between fiction and reality or nature and culture. Probing collective intelligence, surveillance capitalism, AI and the evolution of culture, labor and creativity, she investigates automation, crowdsourcing and data exploitation in the context of art production. Her works often behave like living organisms, self-organized complex systems or bachelor machines. Her past projects include a commission for the façade of the Guggenheim Museum (2015) and a solo exhibition at the Sculpture Center, New York (2013). In 2010 she co-represented Poland at the Venice Biennale of Architecture. Her work was featured in exhibitions at Palais de Tokyo, Guggenheim Bilbao, Tate Modern, Witte de With, Moderna Museet, MUMOK, Bonner Kunstverein, The Kitchen, Frieze Projects and Performa Biennial. She is an artist in residence at MIT CAST and a fellow of the Smithsonian Institute and the Berggruen Institute.

Tobias Rees is the Reid Hoffman Professor of Humanities at the New School for Social Research, Director at the Los Angeles-based Berggruen Institute, and a Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. 
 
Rees finds himself intrigued by situations that are not reducible to the already thought and known—by events, small ones or large ones, that set the taken for granted in motion and thereby provoke unanticipated openings for which no one has words yet. In his writings he seeks to capture something of the at times wild, at other times tender, almost fragile openness that rules as long as the new/different has not yet gained any stable contours—when it is pure movement.
 
Over the last decade his research has explored possibilities of practicing the human sciences after the figure of the human on which the human sciences (and art) has been contingent failed us: The human—the object of the human sciences is a figure not known before the late eighteenth century. 
 
He is the author of Designs for an Anthropology of the Contemporary (2008), Plastic Reason (2016), and most recently of After Ethnos (2018).
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7 months ago
26:41
Journeys with the initiated: Yesomi Umolu, Diedrich Diederichsen, and Anselm Franke

A conversation with Yesomi Umolu, Diedrich Diederichsen, and Anselm Franke on the occasion of Journeys with the initiated, on view at e-flux and Participant Inc through January 13, 2019. The exhibition features artists Malik Gaines, Evan Ifekoya, Grada Kilomba, Tiona Nekkia McClodden, and Virginia de Medeiros, and is curated by Yesomi Umolu with Katja Rivera.

Journeys with the initiated is part of the project Hubert Fichte: Love and Ethnology, initiated by Goethe-Institut and Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), Berlin with the support of S. Fischer Stiftung and the S. Fischer Verlag, and led by artistic directors Diedrich Diederichsen and Anselm Franke. The project runs from 2017 to 2019 in collaboration with numerous partners in Lisbon, Salvador de Bahia, Rio de Janeiro, Santiago de Chile, Dakar, and New York, with the final station culminating in Berlin in 2019.

Excerpt from Journeys with the initiated:

Between 1978 and 1980, queer German novelist, poet, and self-taught ethnographer Hubert Fichte traveled to New York to engage with a city that he perceived to be a center of Afro-diasporic culture and tradition. From the early 1970s and into the following decade, Fichte attempted to create a new ethnology that would run counter to an academic and colonial model. This effort coalesced in Fichte’s development of a diaristic form of ethnographic writing that accounted for his own subjectivity and embeddedness within a given context. Fichte’s novel Die Schwarze Stadt. Glossen, 1990 (The Black City: Glosses) features several sprawling long-form texts and interviews related to his encounters with artists, scholars, activists, spiritualists, everyday citizens, and queer communities in New York.

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8 months ago
28:22
10 years of e-flux journal (part 2/2)

e-flux journal editors Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle, and Kaye Cain-Nielsen discuss 10 years of e-flux journal.

Excerpt from the editorial of e-flux journal issue #95—WONDERFLUX:

In November 2008, the editorial for issue #00 said:

Historically, more than any single institution, art publications have been primary sites for discourse surrounding the artistic field. And yet most recently, the discourse has seemingly moved elsewhere—away from the formal vocabulary used to explain art production, away from traditional art capitals, and away from the printed page. At times, new discursive practices even replace traditional forms of art production. Given the current climate of disciplinary reconfiguration and geographic dispersal, it has become apparent that the urgent task has now become to engage the new intellectual territories in a way that can revitalize the critical vocabulary of contemporary art. We see a fresh approach to the function of an art journal to be perhaps the most productive way of doing this.

With this first, inaugural issue of e-flux journal, we begin something of an experiment in developing both a discursive space and a site for actual art production, in which writers, artists, and thinkers are invited to write on topics of their choosing.

Reading this again ten years on makes us feel grateful for all the brilliant contributors and readers who have shaped the journal over the years. e-flux journal #95 marks a full decade into this strange experiment in contemporary art publishing.

For our tenth birthday, a small group of longtime contributors have written short texts, which artists have illustrated and set to graphic format. Since 2008, the authors included here have continued to shape varied concerns and urgencies into certain consistencies and overarching emergent issues.

We hope you’ll enjoy issue #95: WONDERFLUX.

Stay tuned for events we’re organizing in 2019 to mark the start of the next decade of e-flux journal.

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8 months ago
35:51
10 years of e-flux journal (part 1/2)

e-flux journal editors Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle, and Kaye Cain-Nielsen discuss 10 years of e-flux journal.

Excerpt from the editorial of e-flux journal issue #95—WONDERFLUX:

In November 2008, the editorial for issue #00 said:

Historically, more than any single institution, art publications have been primary sites for discourse surrounding the artistic field. And yet most recently, the discourse has seemingly moved elsewhere—away from the formal vocabulary used to explain art production, away from traditional art capitals, and away from the printed page. At times, new discursive practices even replace traditional forms of art production. Given the current climate of disciplinary reconfiguration and geographic dispersal, it has become apparent that the urgent task has now become to engage the new intellectual territories in a way that can revitalize the critical vocabulary of contemporary art. We see a fresh approach to the function of an art journal to be perhaps the most productive way of doing this.

With this first, inaugural issue of e-flux journal, we begin something of an experiment in developing both a discursive space and a site for actual art production, in which writers, artists, and thinkers are invited to write on topics of their choosing.

Reading this again ten years on makes us feel grateful for all the brilliant contributors and readers who have shaped the journal over the years. e-flux journal #95 marks a full decade into this strange experiment in contemporary art publishing.

For our tenth birthday, a small group of longtime contributors have written short texts, which artists have illustrated and set to graphic format. Since 2008, the authors included here have continued to shape varied concerns and urgencies into certain consistencies and overarching emergent issues.

We hope you’ll enjoy issue #95: WONDERFLUX.

Stay tuned for events we’re organizing in 2019 to mark the start of the next decade of e-flux journal.

Read more Read less
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8 months ago
01:21:37
Jalal Toufic at e-flux, What Was I Thinking?

Recorded at the New York book launch of Jalal Toufic's What Was I Thinking?, February 28, 2018 at e-flux. Published by e-flux journal and Sternberg Press (2017). Lecture by the author and conversation with Walid Raad.

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9 months ago
23:08
Xin Wang on “Asian Futurism and the Non-Other”

Recorded after the publication of e-flux journal issue 81 in April 2017, Xin Wang reads and discusses her text “Asian Futurism and the Non-Other” with Stephen Squibb.

Xin Wang is a curator and art historian based in New York. She recently participated in e-flux journal’s feminism(s) double issue launch with Martha Rosler, McKenzie Wark, and Elvia Wilk. Past curatorial projects include Lu Yang: Arcade (2014, New York), THE BANK SHOW: Vive le Capital and THE BANK SHOW: Hito Steyerl (2015, Shanghai), chin(A)frica: an interface (2017, New York), and Life and Dreams: Photography and Media Art in China since the 1990s (2018, Ulm, Germany). Wang is currently building a discursive archive of Asian Futurisms at afuturism.tumblr.com, and is a PhD candidate in modern and contemporary art at NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts.

Read “Asian Futurism and the Non-Other”: https://www.e-flux.com/journal/81/126662/asian-futurism-and-the-non-other/

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10 months ago
19:25
The Story of Peter Green Peter Chang

In this week's episode of the e-flux podcast, Brian Kuan Wood reads his piece, "The Story of Peter Green Peter Chang," published in February, 2017 as part of e-flux Architecture's Superhumanity project at the 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial.

Brian Kuan Wood is a writer and an editor of e-flux journal.

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10 months ago
28:06
Yuk Hui, Xiaoyu Weng, and Brian Kuan Wood

Following a symposium titled Technology is History, in association with the exhibition One Hand Clapping at the Guggenheim, curator Xiaoyu Weng and Brian Kuan Wood join Yuk Hui to discuss his work.

The conversation was followed by a talk by Yuk Hui at e-flux titled “What Begins After the End of Enlightenment?

Text mentioned in the conversation: 30 Years after Les Immatériaux - Art, Science and Theory

Yuk Hui is a philosopher based in Berlin. He is the author of three monographs: On the Existence of Digital Objects (University of Minnesota Press, 2016), The Question Concerning Technology in China: An Essay in Cosmotechnics (Urbanomic, 2016), and Recursivity and Contingency (Rowman and Littlefield International, Spring 2019). Read Yuk Hui in e-flux journal here.

Xiaoyu Weng is The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art at the Guggenheim.  

Brian Kuan Wood is a founding editor of e-flux journal.

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11 months ago
30:31
Simone White discusses “or, on being the other woman”

Simone White and Judah Rubin discuss White’s recent text, “or, on being the other woman,” published in e-flux journal issue #92 on feminisms. The conversation followed a recent duo lecture at e-flux with Mirene Arsanios and Simone White.

Simone White's most recent book is Dear Angel of Death, published in spring 2018. She lives in Brooklyn and teaches at the University of Pennsylvania.

Judah Rubin is a poet living in Queens. He is the former Monday night coordinator at the Poetry Project and is currently working on texts concerning necropolitics, corruption, and all-you-can-eat buffets.

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11 months ago
41:22
Lawrence Weiner, Julieta Aranda, and Liam Gillick in conversation

Julieta Aranda and Liam Gillick join Lawrence Weiner in his New York studio for a conversation spanning art education and cosmetic dentistry.

Julieta Aranda is an artist and Editor of e-flux journal

Liam Gillick is an artist living in New York. Read Liam Gillick in e-flux journal.

Lawrence Weiner is an artist born in 1942 in New York, NY, where he lives and works today.

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1 year ago
28:28
Mary Walling Blackburn on "Sticky Notes"

Mary Walling Blackburn discusses her text, "Sticky Notes, 1-3," published in e-flux journal #92—"on feminisms" (Summer 2018), with editor-in-chief Kaye Cain-Nielsen.

"The video editing suite sat directly across from 1607 Broadway. My mother’s boyfriend was editing a sequence of two figures fighting with long sticks. They were aiming for one another’s heads. Each man, in turn, carefully swung his fragile skull away from a baton, and then a baton toward another fragile skull swinging away. To the right of the screen was a window. From a certain low angle, at a standing vantage point several feet from the sill, the video sequence and a spectacular outside the glass read as an operative split screen." Excerpt from "Sticky Notes, 1-3"

*Note from Mary: I should be very clear that when referring to dignity I am speaking about "white dignity"; I am trying to communicate that white dignity is bunk and wealthy dignity is bunk. Moreover, when I state that I don't know why 'anyone gets to keep their things with our status'...anyone, again means myself (who qualifies as the privileged poor) and those who operate in wealth within this amplified structure of riches.

 

Mary Walling Blackburn was born in Orange, California. Walling Blackburn's artistic work engages a wide spectrum of materials that probe and intensify the historic, ecological, and class-born brutalities of North American life. Recent publications include Quaestiones Perversas (Pioneer Works, Brooklyn, 2017), co-written with Beatriz E. Balanta; "Gina and the Stars," published by Tamawuj, an off-site publishing platform for the Sharjah Biennial 13; and "Slowness," a performance text in the sound-based web publication Ear│ Wave│Event. 

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1 year ago
28:14
Mirene Arsanios on mother tongues

Mirene Arsanios discusses her text, "E Autobiography di un Idioma," published in e-flux journal #92—"on feminisms" (Summer 2018). In conversation with editor-in-chief Kaye Cain-Nielsen.

"I would have liked to come to you (abo) with something more reliable, like documents (akto), but I’m an oral language (idioma)—an Afro-Portuguese proto-creole developed on the western coast (kosta) of Africa and brought over to the Caribbean in the seventeen century. That’s one of the theories of my genesis. There are others (otronan). Dutch and Spanish tagged along at later stages, with a few Arawak words (palabranan). Initially, slave traders and slaves used me to 'communicate'; then I was just used (merka). The only document in my possession says I was born on the island of Curaçao, north of the Venezuelan shore. Linguists struggle to match my identity to a location. Words travel and land in places (luganan) that do not match their jurisdiction (a nation (nashon)-state)."
Mirene Arsanios, "E Autobiography di un Idioma" 

 

Other works mentioned:
—Iman Mersal, الصوت في غير مكانه (The Displaced Voice); trans. Lisa White (New York: Belladonna* Collaborative, chaplet #232, 2018). Excerpt read by Belladonna editor Ana Paula.
—Iman Mersal, "عن الأمومة والعنف، إيمان مرسال (On Motherhood and Violence)," trans. Anna Ziajka Stanton, Makhzin issue #2—FEMINISMS (Daisy Atterbury, Tarek El-Ariss and Mirene Arsanios, editors)
—Jamaica Kincaid, The Autobiography of My Mother (New York: Macmillan, 1996).

 

Mirene Arsanios is the author of the short story collection The City Outside the Sentence (2015). She has contributed essays and short stories to Vida, The Brooklyn Rail, The Rumpus, The Animated Reader, and The Outpost, among others. Arsanios cofounded the collective 98weeks Research Project in Beirut and is the founding editor of Makhzin, a bilingual English/Arabic magazine for innovative writing. On Friday nights, you can find her at the Poetry Project in New York, where she coordinates the Friday Night reading series with Rachel Valinsky.

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1 year ago
34:57
Eva Díaz: "We Are All Aliens"

Eva Díaz discusses her essay "We Are All Aliens" published in e-flux journal issue 91 (May 2018) with contributing editor Elvia Wilk.

"For some, contemporary art has become a kind of alt-science platform for research and development projects that offer alternatives to the corporate control and surveillance of outer space. Artists working on issues about access to space are at the front line of a critical investigation about the contours of the future, both in its material form and social organization. Many of these artists are challenging the current expansion of capitalist and colonial practices into outer space, particularly that of so-called 'primitive' accumulation: the taking of land and resources for private use. They recognize that much of the tremendous capital amassed in the early 2000s e-commerce and tech boom is now being funneled into astronomically costly 'New Space' projects such as SpaceX, a company funded by PayPal cofounder Elon Musk, and Blue Origin, the space enterprise of Amazon's Jeff Bezos."

–Excerpt from "We Are All Aliens"


Eva Díaz has taught at the Pratt Institute in New York since 2009. Her book The Experimenters: Chance and Design at Black Mountain College was released in 2015 by the University of Chicago Press. She is currently at work on a new book titled After Spaceship Earth, analyzing the influence of R. Buckminster Fuller in contemporary art.

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1 year ago
53:25
Masha Gessen on how to survive an autocracy

Journalist and author Masha Gessen discusses ways of surviving an autocracy. Rule #1? Believe the autocrat.

For this week’s episode of the e-flux podcast, we are featuring Masha Gessen’s lecture, "How We Survive an Autocracy," originally given on May 24, 2017 as part of an ongoing e-flux lectures series dedicated to discovering the protocols of twenty-first century truth, assuming that these still exist.

Launched in February 2017, most e-flux lectures are live streamed on e-flux.com/live and archived at e-flux.com/video.

 

Masha Gessen is a journalist and author, whose most recent book, The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia, won the 2017 National Book Award for Nonfiction. Gessen is also the author of the national bestseller The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin (2012). Gessen is a staff writer at The New Yorker.

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1 year ago
25:25
Parts of Speech: Elvia Wilk and Rachel Ichniowski on issues of power abuse

Elvia Wilk and Rachel Ichniowski discuss issues of power abuse in the artworld. The conversation references Elvia’s recent essays "The Grammar of Work" and "No More Excuses," both published by frieze.

Elvia Wilk is a writer and contributing editor to e-flux journal. You can read another essay published in April 2018, "Is Ornamenting Solar Panels a Crime?" in e-flux Architecture’s initiative Positions.

Rachel Ichniowski is Digital Projects Manager at e-flux.

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1 year ago
28:33
Cooking Sections on how food infrastructures shape the world

Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual and Alon Schwabe) on the occasion of the launch of their book The Empire Remains Shop at e-flux. In conversation with e-flux journal Art Director and artist Mariana Silva.

"Empire shops" were first developed in London in the 1920s to teach the British to consume foodstuffs from the colonies and overseas territories. Although none of the stores ever opened, they were intended to make previously unfamiliar produce and products—sultanas from Australia, oranges from Palestine, cloves from Zanzibar, and rum from Jamaica—available in the British Isles. The Empire Remains Shop speculates on the possibility and implications of selling the remains of the British Empire in London today.

Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual and Alon Schwabe) is a duo of spatial practitioners based out of London. It was born to explore the systems that organize the WORLD through FOOD. Using installation, performance, mapping, and video, their research-based practice explores the overlapping boundaries between visual arts, architecture, and geopolitics. Cooking Sections was part of the exhibition at the U.S. Pavilion, 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale. Their work has also been exhibited at Performa17; 13th Sharjah Biennial; Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin; Storefront for Art & Architecture New York; dOCUMENTA(13); CA2M, Madrid; The New Institute, Rotterdam; UTS, Sydney; HKW Berlin; Akademie der Künste, Berlin; among others, and have been residents in The Politics of Food at Delfina Foundation, London, and Headlands Center for the Arts. The duo were part of the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale and 2016 Brussels ParckDesign. Their work has been featured in a number of international publications (Lars Müller, Sternberg Press, Volume, and Frieze Magazine). The Empire Remains Shop is published by Columbia Books on Architecture and the City–Columbia University Press. They currently lead a studio unit at the RCA, London.

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1 year ago
28:33
David Kim and Yazan Khalili on Hiding Our Faces Like a Dancing Wind

David Kim and Yazan Khalili discuss Yazan's video, Hiding Our Faces Like a Dancing Wind, currently on view in the exhibition Being: New Photography 2018 at MoMA through August 19, 2018.

"How do we disappear in the digital age? This is a project that works with the facial recognition technologies in smart devices and its historical background in the colonial practices."

A segment of the video can be watched on Yazan's website.

You can find an additional conversation on the impossible legality of an artwork between David Kim, Yazan Khalili, Elizabeth A. Povinelli, Jonathan Beller, and Vivian Ziherl in e-flux journal #90.

David Kim is a graduate of Yale Law School, at which he was the curator of JUNCTURE: Explorations in Art and Human Rights, an initiative sponsored by the Schell Center for International Human Rights. Kim is currently a principal at the management consultancy Incandescent. He also collaborates with curators and artists on projects in connection with property, contracts, finance, and human rights.

Yazan Khalili lives and works in and out of Palestine. He is an architect, visual artist, and a cultural activist. Khalili has woven together parallel stories over the years, forming both questions and paradoxes concerning scenery and the act of gazing, all of which are refracted through the prism of intimate politics and alienating poetics. He is the director of the Khalil Sakakini Cultural Center in Ramallah.

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1 year ago
23:21
Middle of Beyond with Keren Cytter

Artist Keren Cytter discusses past and future projects on the occasion of the premiere of her film Middle of Beyond at e-flux. In conversation with Josh Altman. 

Middle of Beyond blends fiction, news clips, and animation recounting ten days in the life of Malte Krumm, a month after the latest US elections. The film depicts the numbness of a world flooded by information and social media activity, where the borders between reality and illusion are crumbling and narcissism and self-promotion overshadow moral values. Based on a true story. 

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1 year ago
33:17
Dena Yago on the "Content Industrial Complex"

Dena Yago discusses her essay "Content Industrial Complex," published in e-flux journal issue 89 (March 2018), with editor-in-chief Kaye Cain-Nielsen.

"What is an artist to do? With an understanding of how our content, identities, and influence are valuable to and instrumentalized by brands and marketers, we can find space for resistance and refusal, or we can actively engage with existing models in an effort to ameliorate them."

Dena Yago is an artist who was born in 1988. She has had numerous gallery and museum exhibitions, including at the Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw and at Bodega in New York.

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1 year ago
31:19
Peggy Ahwesh and Adam Khalil: "time-bombs showing the fault lines of history"

Artists and filmmakers Peggy Ahwesh and Adam Khalil in conversation. 

Peggy Ahwesh is an American experimental filmmaker and video artist. She has produced a range of work since the 1980s challenging traditional forms of film and video, and investigating cultural identity and the role of the subject. Ahwesh's work has been the subject of several museum retrospectives and is screened worldwide, including at e-flux in 2015 as part of Corruption: Everybody Knows… curated by Natasha Ginwala. She has been a professor of Film & Electronic Arts at Bard College since 1990.

More information: Vimeo / EAI catalogue / overview of work by John David Rhodes (2003)

Adam Shingwak Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist. His practice attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. Adam Khalil and Zack Khalil’s film INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a certain place/it flies. falls./] (2016) re-imagines an ancient Ojibway story, the Seven Fires Prophecy, which both predates and predicts first contact with Europeans. It was shown at e-flux on Wednesday, September 21, 2016. A trailer for the feature film co-directed with Bayley James Sweitzer Empty Metal will be out soon.

More information: INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a certain place./it flies. falls./] / The Violence of a Civilization without Secrets co-directed with Zack Khalil and Jackson Polys  

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1 year ago
31:33
Contra-Internet with Zach Blas and Laurel Ptak

Zach Blas in conversation with Laurel Ptak, Art in General's Executive Director & Curator, on the occasion of Blas's exhibition Contra-Internet at Art in General and his lecture-performance Metric Mysticism at e-flux.

Zach Blas is an artist and writer whose practice confronts technologies of capture, security, and control. Currently, he is a Lecturer in the Department of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London. His recent works respond to biometric governmentality and network hegemony.

Read more about the exhibition, on view through April 21, 2018, at artingeneral.org

Read Zach Blas' essay in e-flux journal #74 (June 2016): "Contra-Internet"

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1 year ago
33:29
Immortality for all: Anton Vidokle on cosmism

e-flux founder, journal editor, and artist Anton Vidokle discusses cosmism with Kaye Cain-Nielsen, editor-in-chief of e-flux journal.

You can read more on cosmism in the 88th issue of e-flux journal (February 2018). Featuring texts by Robert Bird, Maria Chehonadskih, Keti Chukhrov, Boris Groys, Trevor Paglen, Alexei Penzin, Marina Simakova, Arseny Zhilyaev, and a Timeline of Russian Cosmism compiled by Anastasia Gacheva, Arseny Zhilyaev, and Anton Vidokle. 

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1 year ago
52:32
Elizabeth A. Povinelli on the four axioms of critical theory

Elizabeth A. Povinelli discusses four axioms of critical theory in response to her presentation, "Toxic Assets the the Extimacy of Existence," from Frontier Imaginaries Ed.No3 at e-flux. In conversation with journal editor Stephen Squibb.

Read Elizabeth A. Povinelli in e-flux journal:

"Geontologies: The Concept and Its Territories" from issue 81, April 2017

"Geontologies: The Figures and the Tactics" from issue 78, December 2016

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1 year ago
28:31
Vivian Ziherl on Frontier Imaginaries, Toxic Assets, and The Fourfold Articulation

Vivian Ziherl discusses her curatorial platform Frontier Imaginaries on the occasion of TOXIC ASSETS: Frontier Imaginaries Ed.No3 at e-flux, Columbia University, and UnionDocs in October 2017. In conversation with journal editor Brian Kuan Wood.

Watch day one of TOXIC ASSETS on e-flux film & video

Read Vivian Ziherl's essay "The Fourfold Articulation" in e-flux journal #81, April 2017

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1 year ago
24:47
McKenzie Wark on the fate of art collecting in the digital age

McKenzie Wark on his essay, "My Collectible Ass," published in the 85th issue of e-flux journal, October 2017. In conversation with journal editor Stephen Squibb.

 

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