October 26, 2008 - The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts - Warhol Live
October 26, 2008

Warhol Live

Debbie Harry
1980
Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen
106.7 x 106.7 cm
The Andy Warhol Museum Pittsburgh
Founding Collection, Contribution
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
1998.1.564
Copyright The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Warhol Live
September 25, 2008 – January 18, 2009

Jean-Noël Desmarais Pavilion
1380 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, Quebec 

Canada

www.mbam.qc.ca

THE ROLE OF MUSIC IN THE ARTIST’S WORK EXPLORED FOR THE FIRST TIME AT THE MONTREAL MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, FALL 2008

For the first time in the historiography of Andy Warhol (1928-1987), the exhibition-event Warhol Live, presented from September 25, 2008, to January 18, 2009, will explore the all-pervading and fundamental role of music and dance in the artist’s work and life. Music is an essential narrative element that is present throughout the exhibition and will guide visitors as they rediscover Warhol’s work. From this unusual angle, viewers will be treated to a chronological and thematic reading, from the film music Warhol discovered in his youth to the disco scene at Studio 54, the legendary nightclub that opened in 1977, where he was one of the most famous regulars. The exhibition will bring together some 640 works and objects, paintings, silkscreens, photographs, works on paper, installations, films, videos, album covers, as well as objects and documents from the artist’s personal archives. It will juxtapose Warhol’s major emblematic works (Elvis, Marilyn, Liza Minnelli, Grace Jones, Mick Jagger, Debbie Harry, the Self-portraits and the Campbell’s Soup Cans) with other, lesser-known works (album covers, illustrations, photos and Polaroids). There are also the artist’s films, including Sleep and Empire, as well as the Screen Tests of the musicians of the famous Velvet Underground, Andy Warhol’s TV and video clips produced for groups like The Cars and Curiosity Killed the Cat. The exhibition Warhol Live is produced by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in partnership with The Andy Warhol Museum, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh.

The works come from The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and from leading public and private collections in Europe and North America. A collection of some fifty album covers belonging to Montreal collector Paul Maréchal will be presented together for the first time. It includes The Velvet Underground & Nico, Sticky Fingers (Rolling Stones), Love You Live (Rolling Stones), Silk Electric (Diana Ross), Aretha (Aretha Franklin) and Rockbird (Debbie Harry).

Music: An Essential Part of Warhol’s Work
While Warhol’s interest in music comes across highly anecdotally and briefly in his Journal and his numerous interviews, music and its representation in his work is remarkable and predominant: it is an invisible yet essential component.

From a drawing in 1948 for the cover of Cano – the student magazine at the Carnegie Institute of Technology, which depicts an orchestra in the “blotted line” technique – to the celebrity portraits of Mick Jagger, Liza Minnelli and Prince, Warhol created dozens of portraits of twentieth-century pop icons, from Elvis to the Rolling Stones, from the Beatles to Michael Jackson, throughout his career. From 1949, the year he arrived in New York, to 1987, the last year of his life, he also illustrated some fifty album covers, from Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake to Aretha Franklin, Count Basie, Artie Shaw, the Velvet Underground, the Rolling Stones, Diana Ross and Blondie. Attesting to Warhol’s changing commissions and affinities, the thread that runs through this iconography reads like a history of postwar American musical tastes, from classical to jazz, rock, pop and soul, disco and hip-hop.

In Warhol’s world, music goes far beyond mere iconography. Warhol orchestrated the “All Tomorrow’s Parties” at the Silver Factory, providing an ideal, ephemeral stage for Edie Sedgwick, his moving muse and first alter ego; he served as a producer for the Velvet Underground; he made an artistic contribution to Merce Cunningham’s choreography Rain Forest; he turned Studio 54 into an extension of his studio. Set to music, the invisible art that animates bodies and situates beings in space and in their time, he imagined the entire work of art that was Exploding Plastic Inevitable. He imagined himself in Sculpture Invisible. He used music in his films and filmed concerts. He produced music videos and met with musicians, notably for Interview, the magazine he founded in 1969. And above all, through the play of mirrors and osmosis he projected on his contemporaries, he himself became a rock star equal to Mick Jagger or Debbie Harry, his final inspiration.

Exhibition Design
Guillaume de Fontenay’s exhibition design will evoke some of the highlights in this relationship between art and music through reconstitutions that, while not exact re-creations like “period rooms,” will provide a closer look at the Silver Factory, with a mise en scène by photographer Billy Name, the multimedia show Exploding Plastic Inevitable to music by the Velvet Underground, Silver Clouds created for Merce Cunningham’s choreography Rain Forest to music by David Tudor, and the musical ambience of Studio 54, a veritable extension of Warhol’s studio from the 1970s to the end of his life.

Publications
For the first time, two publications will address music’s influence on Warhol’s work. A lavishly illustrated exhibition catalogue (288 pages and approximately 450 illustrations), overseen by Stéphane Aquin, includes essays by numerous Warhol specialists, as well as first-person accounts (such as a conversation with Glenn O’Brien, Director of Interview) and unpublished writings. At the same time, a critical catalogue raisonné of the record covers designed by Warhol has been written by Paul Maréchal, the collector of this body of work (240 pages and approximately 250 illustrations). These works are published in English and French by the Museum’s Publishing Department and distributed by Prestel.

Curators
The exhibition is curated by Stéphane Aquin, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts; Emma Lavigne, curator at the Musée national d’art moderne/CCI, Centre Pompidou, Paris; and Matt Wrbican, archivist at The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. Greg Pierce, assistant curator, The Andy Warhol Museum, put together the exhibition’s film and video programming.

Sponsors
The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts’ International Exhibition Programme receives financial support from the Exhibition Fund of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts Foundation and the Paul G. Desmarais Fund.

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts wishes to thank GBC Asset Management and Bell for their support and media partners La Presse and The Gazette. Its gratitude also extends to Quebec’s Ministère de la Culture, des Communications et de la Condition féminine for its ongoing support.

The Museum would like to thank the Volunteer Association of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts for its invaluable support. It would also like to thank all its Friends and the many corporations, foundations and people who support its mission.

INFORMATION
Sylvie Deslauriers or Catherine Guex
Public Relations
514-285-1600
cguex@mbamtl.org

Images of works are available on the Museum’s Web site at www.mmfa.qc.ca/media

Instructions to follow for reproducing works of art: The work of art is to be reproduced in its entirety without cropping, bleeding, guttering, overprinting or other alteration of any kind, and the caption and photo credit must accompany the illustration of the work.

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

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