January 26, 2014 - Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis - Spring 2014 exhibitions
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January 26, 2014

Spring 2014 exhibitions

Nicole Eisenman, Sloppy Bar Room Kiss, 2011. Oil on canvas, 39 x 48 inches. Collection of Cathy and Jonathan Miller. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

Spring 2014 exhibitions
January 24–April 13, 2014

Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis 
3750 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63108
Hours: Wednesday 11am–6pm, 
Thursday–Friday 11am–9pm, 
Saturday–Sunday 10am–5pm

T +1 314 535 4660

www.camstl.org

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013
January 24–April 13
Featuring more than 120 works, this definitive mid-career survey of the work of celebrated American artist Nicole Eisenman charts the development of her practice across painting, printmaking, drawing, and sculpture over the last twenty years. Fusing centuries-old art-making techniques with contemporary subject matter, Eisenman’s work explores issues of identity, sexuality, and community, often incorporating both humor and incisive sociopolitical critique. Curator: Kelly Shindler.

Joyce Pensato: I KILLED KENNY
January 24–April 13
Joyce Pensato: I KILLED KENNY—the artist’s first museum survey—brings together recent work with seminal earlier pieces. The exhibition features a monumental site-specific mural as well as charcoal drawings and key paintings. Pensato’s gestural paintings and drawings appropriate iconic American cartoon characters, combining menacing abstraction with comedic representation. Curator: Jeffrey Uslip. 

Readykeulous by Ridykeulous: This is What Liberation Feels Like™
Mezzanine Gallery: January 24–April 13
Front Room: March 7–April 13
Ridykeulous is a curatorial initiative founded by Nicole Eisenman and A.L. Steiner. This is What Liberation Feels Like™ presents a wide array of emotionally charged works by artists and activists, including Tracey Emin, Donald Judd, Carolee Schneemann, Kara Walker, and David Wojnarowicz. Beginning March 7, the exhibition extends into the Front Room gallery, featuring a selection of historically significant pieces of video art. Curators: Nicole Eisenman and A.L. Steiner.

Ron Gorchov: Serapis 
January 24–April 13
Painting since the 1960s, Ron Gorchov is best known for his shaped canvases that act as both painting and sculpture, allowing for a dialogue between structure and surface. At fourteen feet tall and thirteen feet wide, Serapis stands as a massive and totemic structure that marks the entrance to the Museum. Visitors are invited to move around it, seeing both its painted facade and the raw monumentality of the wooden structure that supports it. Curator: Lisa Melandri.

Front Room
Tomasz Kowalski
January 24–March 2
A key figure among today’s young Polish artists, Tomasz Kowalski presents his first solo exhibition in an American museum at CAM. His anxious and brooding paintings, sculptures, and works on paper are as informed by the concerns of expressionism, surrealism, graphic design, and experimental theater as they are by his own autobiography. This presentation features a body of entirely new work made for the exhibition. Curator: Kelly Shindler.

Street Views
Takeshi Murata: Melter 2
January 24–April 27, dusk–midnight, every night
Takeshi Murata: Melter 2—the second exhibition in CAM’s series of large-scale video art—transforms the Museum’s Washington Boulevard facade into a brightly colored animation. In the video, various shapes—which recall organic forms such as flowers, mountains, and waves—undulate and melt into one another, referencing nature, psychedelia, and early computer graphics. Curator: Kelly Shindler.


Audible Interruptions
January 24–April 13

Nathan Cook: Transmutation Passages
Transforming CAM’s elevator into a laboratory for sonic investigation, Nathan Cook presents an ambitious sound installation in four parts. The content will change every month, exploring themes related to movement, space, and travel. 

Andrew James: Toss and Turn Toss and Turn 
Andrew James often uses technology to filter information into abstract visual and auditory systems. For Toss and Turn Toss and Turn, he fills CAM’s first-floor hallway with the various riffs, sounds, and melodies that sometimes creep into his head while falling asleep. Curator: Kevin Harris.


About the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
The Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (CAM) presents, supports, and celebrates the art of our time. It is the premier museum in St. Louis dedicated to contemporary art. Focused on a dynamic array of changing exhibitions, CAM provides a thought-provoking program that reflects and contributes to the global cultural landscape. Through the diverse perspectives offered in its exhibitions, public programs, and educational initiatives, CAM actively engages a range of audiences to challenge their perceptions. It is a site for discovery, a gathering place in which to experience and enjoy contemporary visual culture.


 

Spring 2014 exhibitions at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
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