Paradox is at the heart of the relationship between architecture and citizenship. For every act of fortified inclusion and exclusion, there is a counter, perhaps informal or subversive, act that strives to undermine distinctions. Border walls are the default architectures that describe nationhood, but also just one of many architectural expressions of citizenship. Citizenship has never been constituted as a singular, monumental edifice, reducible to any one institution of power or construction of identity. As a cluster of rights, responsibilities, and attachments, the lived experience of citizenship speaks to the plural, complex, and intimate relations we have with the actual and virtual spaces we inhabit. If citizenship itself designates both a border and the networks that traverse and ultimately elude them, then what kind of architecture might be offered offer in lieu of “The Wall”? What designed objects, buildings, or spaces might speak to the heart of what and how it means to belong today?

Dimensions of Citizenship is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture and the United States Pavilion of the 16th International Architecture Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia. The first seven essays of Dimensions of Citizenship were published as a part of Dimensions of Citizenship: Architecture and Belonging from the Body to the Cosmos (Inventory Press, 2018).

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12 essays
Enrique Ramirez
The whole structure of American thought was against me. —Chester Himes 1 There is a building. Fisk Hall, on the campus of...
The advent of postcolonial theory in the 1970s and 1980s involved the realization that liberal political philosophy was guilty of masking, even...
Architects are turning towards justice. We can see this in the rise of socially-oriented student groups in architecture schools, new organizations...
Mabel O. Wilson
The real estate woman, who didn’t fathom she could have made an appointment to show her house to you, spends much of the walk-through telling...
Nicholas de Monchaux
Prelude: Pine Gap Joint Defence Facility Pine Gap, code named RAINFALL, sits outside of Alice Springs, in Australia’s unincorporated Northern...
Ingrid Burrington
For about as long as there has been a networked world there have been people adorning it with the accessories and ephemera of the nation-state....
Jennifer Scappettone
Consider two terminals of American architecture, one positive, one negative, in an epicenter of global capital streams: a colossus and a void. The...
Dan Handel
There was nothing but land: not a country at all, but the material out of which countries were made. —Willa Cather, My Antonia (1917)...
Indifferent Systems In November 2017, the Nebraska Public Service Commission voted 3-2 in favor of allowing the proposed Keystone XL pipeline...
Ana María León
From the day of its birth, the anomaly of slavery plagued a nation which asserted the equality of all men, and sought to derive powers of...
Adrienne Brown
[Citizenship] is an ordinary space of activity that many people occupy without thinking much about it. —Lauren Berlant 1 Even the...
Niall Atkinson, Nick Axel, Iker Gil, Nikolaus Hirsch, Ann Lui, Anton Vidokle, and Mimi Zeiger
Dimensions of Citizenship is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture and the United States Pavilion of the 16th International Architecture...
Category
Globalization, Borders & Frontiers
Subject
Citizenship, Public Space, State & Government

Dimensions of Citizenship is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture and the United States Pavilion of the 16th International Architecture Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia.

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