October 5, 2011 - frieze - issue 142 out now
October 5, 2011

issue 142 out now

Issue 142: Out Now

frieze.com

Exclusively in the October issue of frieze, we present SUR L’ART (On Art), a previously unpublished artist project by Marcel Broodthaers. Originally intended for a 1975 issue of Studio International, it is available here for the first time as Broodthaers intended. The project is introduced by curator and art historian Cathleen Chaffee.

Artists in the UK are increasingly turning to narrative cinema and mainstream TV. Ed Atkins, Melanie Gilligan, Anja Kirschner and Ben Rivers take part in a panel discussion led by Dan Kidner, discussing how this tendency relates to issues of funding, ideology, duration and display.

The work of Ryan Trecartin is explored in an essay by Chris Wiley and an interview with the artist by novelists Katie Kitamura and Hari Kunzru.

The October issue also features: Max Andrews on radicalism, inadequacy and the excluded in the work of Dora García, whose collaborations and performances can be seen in the Spanish Pavillion of the Venice Biennale until the end of November; and Yto Barrada in conversation with frieze co-editor Jennifer Higgie about her reasons for opening a cinematheque in Tangier. Jesse Ball discusses his new novel The Curfew; artist and professor Malcolm Le Grice traces the history of Central Saint Martins, the first in an occasional series about international art schools; and, on the occasion of a major retrospective of her work, pioneering composer Eliane Radigue talks about her 50-year career, electronic music, Buddhism and ‘anti-acoustics’.

In our columns, contributing editor Douglas Fogle (curator of contemporary art at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles) suggests some rules for artists and curators that they don’t teach at art school: ‘Kill your parents: While Sophocles teaches us that killing your parents is a far from productive endeavour, the same cannot be said within the world of culture.’ Elsewhere, Kaelen Wilson-Goldie considers the problems of funding art during times of revolution; Jennifer Allen asks if artists should join arguments about national identity; George Pendle heralds the Museum of Cryptozoology; Michael Sayeau maps the changing shape of demonstrations; Frances Morgan looks at the politics of big bands and artist Deimantas Narkevicius talks about his favourite films.

On the back page, Yayoi Kusama answers the frieze Questionnaire.
What should stay the same? ‘Peace and love among the people.’

The reviews section features 33 exhibitions from 25 cities, including the Georges Didi-Huberman-curated show ‘Atlas: How to Carry the World on One’s Back’ at ZKM/Museum for Contemporary Art, Karlsruhe; Cory Arcangel at Whitney Museum for American Art, New York; Dane Mitchell, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth Artspace, Auckland; and Eva Rothschild, The Hepworth, Wakefield. As well as reviews from Aachen, Antwerp, Athens, Berlin, Bordeaux, Glasgow, Hamburg, Jakarta, Krems, London, Los Angles, Madrid, Manchester, Nottingham, Rome, Roskilde, San Francisco, Shanghai, Turin and Vancouver.

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Frieze Writer’s Prize 2011

The winner of the Frieze Writer’s Prize 2011 is Zoe Pilger for her review of Tracey Emin at The Hayward Gallery, London. She has been awarded 2,000 GBP and her first commissioned review for frieze will be published in issue 144.

Read her winning entry on frieze.com/writersprize

Exclusively Online

On the frieze blog Tirdad Zolghadr reports on the third annual Creative Time Summit in New York; Anne Colvin remembers the filmmaker George Kuchar; Dan Fox on the life and art of Richard Hamilton; and Markus Miessen talks to Amsterdam-based research studio Metahaven about the Dutch funding cuts.

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