Infrastructure is inherited from the past—not only through material artifacts and physical configurations but also through spatial imaginaries, affective relations, and shared memories. Such inheritances may be immaterial, as in the way a colonial railway conveys romantic memories of travel for some or resilience against the traumas of subjugation for others. They may be projective, fueling individual aspirations of prosperity, mobility, or belonging. Or they may signify “roads not taken,” propelling dreams of another, radically different future. Inheritance can also be forged from material artifacts. As new, monumental infrastructures of postcolonial nation-building have risen, colonial-era infrastructures have crumbled.

Coloniality of Infrastructure is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture, Critical Urbanisms at the University of Basel, and the African Centre for Cities of the University of Cape Town.

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10 essays
Achille Mbembe
Humanity has been a constant, sometimes blind force in the history of the living world. To achieve its project of universal domination once and...
The plain of Tavoliere, which makes up the largest portion of the district of Foggia, in the upper part of Italy’s southeastern Apulian region,...
Megan Eardley
In the mid-twentieth century, apartheid South Africa was home to some of the largest, deepest, and most profitable mines in the world. Operating...
Since the 1950s, various petroleum and gas wells have been dug on African Saharan soils. Thousands of kilometers of pipelines have been built on...
Garissa Lodge Garissa Lodge is widely known as the first “Somali mall.” A multi-story building hosting mixed-use shopping and residential...
Sarah Nuttall
In her 2019 novel The Old Drift , Namwali Serpell writes about the Kariba Dam, southern Africa’s largest hydroelectric power source, and the...
I The Italian colonization of Libya began in 1911 and escalated under fascist rule, leading to the brutal repression of armed resistance led by...
It is July 1990. Janet Love, an uMkhonto we Sizwe (“Spear of the Nation,” abbreviated MK) commander sits by herself in an office in Johannesburg...
In the mid-1880s, Kimberley’s diamond mines began constructing massive complexes to house their laborers. 1 The closed compounds—so named because...
Kenny Cupers
Coloniality of Infrastructure is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture, Critical Urbanisms at the University of Basel, and the African...
Category
Architecture, Colonialism & Imperialism
Subject
Infrastructure, Africa, Racism, Extractivism, Postcolonialism

Coloniality of Infrastructure is a collaboration between e-flux Architecture, Critical Urbanisms at the University of Basel, and the African Centre for Cities of the University of Cape Town.

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