As twentieth-century dreams of globalization continue shattering into the third decade of the new millennium, what we find in their wake are borders. Regardless of its scale, the border takes the self as its subject, defining it in relation to an other. Today, these borders are both physical and digital, geographical and political, all around and deep within us.

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22 essays
Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman
The Tijuana-San Diego border region is a global laboratory for engaging the central challenges of urbanization today: deepening social and...
Introduction After three months of stringent restriction on travel to and within the EU, Monday June 5 was heralded by the EU Commission as...
Tatiana Bilbao and Ayesha S. Ghosh
Unlike tracings which propagate redundancies, mappings discover new worlds within past and present ones; they inaugurate new grounds upon the...
Lorenzo Pezzani
In May 2012, the United Kindgom’s then-home secretary Theresa May announced in an interview the introduction of new, groundbreaking legislation in...
Shahram Khosravi and Mahmoud Keshavarz
In early March 2020, the Turkish government found itself stuck in a military conflict with Russia in Idlib, a border city in northwest Syria. The...
Almost everyone, outside of North Korea, thinks that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) will eventually collapse and be absorbed by...
Cristina Goberna Pesudo
30 hours. On Thursday, March 12th, the newspapers were on fire. Every four hours their headlines changed. We woke up to the news that the...
Andrew Herscher and Ana María León
The colonial genealogy of the contemporary nation-state border frames any politics of their opening. Borders are opened when they are approached,...
Andrea Bagnato
Red Zones The first time Italians heard the expression zona rossa (“red zone”) was in June 2001, in the lead up to the G8 in Genoa. In...
The South China Sea is a semi-enclosed sea. It is located south of China and Taiwan; east of Vietnam; and west and north of the archipelago...
Lydia Kallipoliti
Within the short course of a few days, we’ve all come to meet and live on Zoom. 1 In pivoting to online learning, we deliberate on how new forms...
Theo Deutinger
The border between the US and Mexico was first defined by the “United States and Mexican Boundary Survey” (1848–1855) in accordance with the...
Daniel Fernández Pascual
1. The Beetle and the Seagrass Against the Port If property depends on clearly defined boundaries … then coastal/marine property is...
Caitlin Blanchfield and Nina Valerie Kolowratnik
1. Wall On February 27, 2020 Ned Norris, Chairman of the Tohono O’odham Nation, addressed the United States House of Representatives...
¶ I imagine limbo as an extraterritoriality without walls, without corners, windows, entrances or exits. I can also cast it as ocean and...
Jostling around our necks, the dosimeters flashed their readings and the ticking of the handheld geiger counter spasmed sporadically in alarm. We...
Ersela Kripa & Stephen Mueller
The US-Mexico borderlands can be defined by shifting and intensifying bands of ultraviolet radiation that impact bodies in asymmetrical ways,...
Justin McGuirk
What is the opposite of an exodus? Not the flooding of people into a city, but its emptying out by a kind of implosion—the city withdrawing into...
Ifor Duncan and Stefanos Levidis
The Dam On the 10th of March, news reports emerged suggesting that Bulgaria had released water downstream from the Ivaylovgrad Dam on the...
In Pursuit of a Single Map Munir is a 23-year-old high-school-educated data technician hired by a private geospatial mapping company in...
Borders are indispensable to capital’s formatting of the world. As social institutions, borders not only mediate relations of capital and state...
Nick Axel, Jan Boelen, Charlotte Dumoncel d’Argence, and Nikolaus Hirsch
At The Border is a collaboration between A/D/O and e-flux Architecture within the context of its 2019/2020 Research Program, featuring...
Category
Borders & Frontiers, Bodies, Migration & Immigration, Data & Information
Subject
Sovereignty, Climate change

At The Border is a collaboration between A/D/O and e-flux Architecture within the context of its 2019/2020 Research Program.

Contributors
  • Nick Axel, Jan Boelen, Charlotte Dumoncel d’Argence, and Nikolaus Hirsch Editorial
  • Brett Neilson Capital Operations: Data and Waste
  • Cindy Lin How to Make a Forest
  • Ifor Duncan and Stefanos Levidis Weaponizing a River
  • Justin McGuirk Space Unleashed
  • Ersela Kripa & Stephen Mueller An Ultraviole(n)t Border
  • Jason Waite The Entropic Silence of Fukushima
  • Dan Fox No Day, No Night
  • Caitlin Blanchfield and Nina Valerie Kolowratnik Significant Impact
  • Daniel Fernández Pascual Littoral Ambiguities
  • Theo Deutinger Let’s Call it a Wall
  • Lydia Kallipoliti Zoom In, Zoom Out
  • MAP Office The South China Sea Monument
  • Andrea Bagnato Staying at Home
  • Andrew Herscher and Ana María León At the Border of Decolonization
  • Cristina Goberna Pesudo The Unrequited Architectures of Desire
  • Kyong Park We just have to wait a little longer
  • Shahram Khosravi and Mahmoud Keshavarz The Magic of Borders
  • Lorenzo Pezzani Hostile Environments
  • Tatiana Bilbao and Ayesha S. Ghosh Where is the border?
  • Charles Heller De-confining Borders: Towards Freedom of Movement
  • Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman Unwalling Citizenship
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